Monatliches Archiv: März 2016

Ruhrland Hospital School in Essen (Germany)

Ruhrland Hospital School

Ruhrland Hospital School (Photo: H. Frey)

Our school: Situated in the very heart of the Ruhr valley in North Rhine Westphalia (west of Germany) our hospital school offers lessons for students of all grades, school types and all abilities and special needs. On average we teach about 160 pupils per day, i.e. about 1.000 per year, 15 per cent with physical/ chronic, 85 per cent with psychiatric diseases. They are taught by 30 teachers (about half of them trained for special needs education) at seven units spread across the city.

Our teaching sites: in our main building a team of four teachers offers special lessons for about 20 out-patients, in two in-patient Clinics for Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Psychotherapy there are six units with teams of two to four teachers each who teach about 70 students, about 30 students are taught by two teams of three/ four teachers in two  day-units (Child and Adolescent Psychiatry), three teachers work with about 25 students in the University Paediatric Clinic, two colleagues work in the institution “StepOut”, home for about ten youth with drug abuse background; finally, in “House Columbus”, an optionally closed institution, ten girls who need intensive educational care are taught by two teachers.

Within the different units we all follow one major aim: bridging the gap between pre- and post-medical treatment, i.e. accompanying transitions and promoting re-integration into the regular school system by teaching the core subjects (German, Maths, English), by offering all sorts of helpful counseling and coaching, and by promoting cooperation and networking with all people/ systems involved in the complex process.

Special lessons/ classes: Of course, we offer more to our students than just teaching the core subjects. In summer we profit from the fact that we are situated on the river Ruhr. So we go canoeing with some of our students on Lake Baldeney. Other students have the chance to take part in (orthopedagogical) equestrian vaulting lessons because we are lucky and have two teachers who are not only horse-maniacs, but also trained experts. Throughout the academic year our units organise day trips, projects, exhibitions – usually closely connected to lesson topics or topical events. Two special projects aim at connecting all the different units with their different demands: a project week in summer with one overall topic, e.g. “happiness”, which ends with a summer festival in and around our main building, and our school magazine (Zwischenzeitung – Magazine “In-between”), which is published once a year and contains articles, drawings, interviews etc. made by our students.

Back to school: As a result of a research project on the topic “school absence” we offer – together with clinic experts – special counseling for parents with children/ youth who have not attended school for a longer period. It is a project based on the cooperation of Essen education authority, educational counseling center, youth welfare office, Ruhrland Hospital School, regular schools and the local LVR Clinic for Child and Youth Psychiatry and Psychotherapy.

Perspectives:  In difficult and changing times teacher training plays an essential role, e.g. in the field of new technologies (“mobile learning”, “learning online”, “video conferencing”), teaching German as a secondary language (- you know about the number of refugees entering into our school system) and counseling/ coaching – complex, difficult situations demand competent, professional ways of communication, e.g. when talking with teachers at regular schools about compensations for students with long-term illnesses who have a legal right to individual compensation for the (educational) disadvantages they might experience because of their illness. In addition, we stand in for promoting the needs of our students on a political scale: educational laws must be adjusted to the fact that one out of five German pupils experiences a period within his/ her educational life with a serious illness and, thus, school absence/ need for home or hospital schooling.

Heidrun Friebel

Heidrun Friebel

Author: Heidrun Friebel, Hildegardstr. 83, D – 45475 Mülheim; Email: heifriebel@hotmail.com

Trained as a grammar school teacher (1989-1991) I worked as a teacher for English and German at different comprehensive schools in the Ruhr valley from 1991 till Feb. 2010. Since then I have been teaching at Ruhrland Hospital School, Essen, at different units (physical and psychiatric, in- and out-patient). In addition, I have also been working in the field of orthopedagogy since 2004.

 

 

 

Canoeing at Lake Baldeney, Essen (Photo: Ruhrland Hospital School)

Canoeing at Lake Baldeney, Essen (Photo: Ruhrland Hospital School)

“Angels – what do they mean to you?” – Project with students in the University Paediatric Clinic (Photo: Ruhrland Hospital School)

“Angels – what do they mean to you?” – Project with students in the University Paediatric Clinic (Photo: Ruhrland Hospital School)

Academic Hospital School in Uppsala (Sweden)

We are 11 teachers/specialteachers and one director in three units. Some of us are special teachers.

  1. Somatic hospital (children’s hospital)
  2. Psychiatric hospital ward. (acute ward)
  3. Regional Rehabilitation ward. (physical and neurology)

School children in hospital, are protected by the Swedish law of school, and should be provided education by hospital teachers. The teachers are employed by the municipality with economic support by the Swedish government.

In the big national hospitals, often connected to a university, there´s always a hospital school. We have in Sweden a national association with about 120 associated members. Every second year between a HOPE-conference we have our national conference.

The teachers within our group have different specializations. Our aim is to be able to meet all children´s needs and provide a similar education as far as possible. We have two separate classrooms, one for older and one for younger kids, naturally we teach in the wards, as well. For kids with complicated disease and long treatment the hospitalschool is important for improving results and hopefully, you don’t need to restart your time in school.IMG_0080 (1) IMG_1123 IMG_1140 (2)

Nordre Aker school in Oslo (Norway)

Nordre Aker Skole - Nydalen

Nordre Aker Skole – Nydalen

Nordre Aker School provides education for children who are patients at Oslo University Hospital, at the Children’s Division of Mental Health.
The children are between 6 and 18 years old and are temporary students at Nordre Aker School while following a treatment program at the hospital.

Nordre Aker School is an institution school consisting of two divisions‘- Nydalen and Sogn.
The school’s primary role is educational survey, training and outreach activities. The children are given a specially designed training program in close cooperation with the unit and the schooling is based on the treatment given.
Nordre Aker school is an institution school rooted in the school Education Act § 13 – 3a

The Childrens division – Nydalen
The school provides an educational program for children who are enrolled in the Children’s Division of Mental Health, which consists of two units, A and B. The target group is children aged between 4 and 14 years old. The treatment is individualized for each child and family.

Special education teachers from Nordre Aker School are part of the treatment team. The teachers are responsible for educational assessment; they work closely with the local school, PPT (educational psychology service) and any other departments involved. The school follows a flexible model, in which the teachers provide with help and guidance to the children’s local school. When needed special teaching is provided within the school premises.

Students can not apply directly to Nordre Aker School. The offer applies only to children who are patients at the Children’s Division of Mental Health.

The Youth division – Sogn
The school provides an educational program for children and adolescents from 13 to 18 who are enrolled in the Youth Division of Mental Health. It consists of two units: Intensive care day -and night unit and Intermediær.

The school also provides services for children and adolescents from 4 to 18 years who are patients at the family and network.

Special education teachers from Nordre Aker School are part of the treatment team. The teachers are responsible for educational assessment; they work closely with the local school, PPT (educational psychology service) and any other departments involved. The school follows a flexible model, in which the teachers provide with help and guidance to the children’s local school. When needed special teaching is provided within the school premises.

Nordre Aker skole - Sogn

Nordre Aker skole – Sogn

Contact data:

Nordre Aker skole
Sognsvannsveien 67,
0372 OSLO
Norway

Telefon:+ 47 22144000
E-post: nordreaker@ude.oslo.kommune.no
www.ude.oslo.kommune.no

Tikkamäki hospital school, Joensuu (Finland)

Tikkamäki school

Tikkamäki school

Tikkamäki School, which takes care of hospital teaching in Joensuu, is part of the town’s school system. The pupils can originally come from comprehensive schools in different parts of North Karelia and the municipality of Heinävesi. The pupils are undergoing medical examination or treatment in the child psychiatric, child neurological, youth psychiatric or somatic ward in the Central Hospital of North Karelia. Some pupils come to school from their home and they are undergoing treatment in youth psychiatric policlinic. Tikkamäki School is administered by Nepenmäki Comprehensive School.

The aim of hospital teaching is to make sure that the pupil is not left behind in their studies. Providing education during hospitalization is also a means of giving the pupil hope regarding their own future and of preventing their exclusion from society. Teaching is part of the child’s overall rehabilitation and its starting point is creating a positive relationship between the pupil and the teacher.

Tikkamäki School is situated in building L at the Central Hospital of North Karelia. School is  for forms 0.-6. ( i.e. children aged 6-12) and for forms 7.-9. (age 13-15) study. School is in the same building as children`s and youth`s  psychiatric wards so co-operation is feasible. The teaching of each pupil is planned individually and the curriculum of the forwarding school is followed as closely as possible. In addition to individuality, the curriculum of Tikkamäki School emphasizes art and expressive skills in the preschool class and in the 1st– 6th  forms  and foreign languages, mathematics and practical subjects in  the 7th-9th forms. In the ninth form the emphasis also lies in planning further studies. The length of the pupil’s school day is affected by their condition, treatment and ability to work in groups.

Tikkamäki´s staff

Tikkamäki´s staff

The hospital teachers co-operate with the teachers of the pupil’s home school. As the pupil is entering examination or treatment in the ward, the teacher discusses matters relating to school with the home school teachers. During the pupil’s stay in hospital school their curriculum and evaluation also create close co-operation with the forwarding school. When the pupil is returning to their home school the hospital teacher visits the home school supporting their return to school in a return meeting. The participants of this meeting are the pupil, the parent, teacher in the home school and the hospital teacher. During the examination and treatment periods there is also close co-operation with the parents and  the medical staff in consultations about both school and treatment matters.

In matters relating to education the parents are always asked to contact Tikkamäki School. The medical staff is responsible for the treatment. If the child is absent, the parent must inform the school. If the pupil needs a permission to be absent, the parent must ask for the  permission from the school.

In preschool and the 1st-6th forms the staff includes special education teachers Irja Hara, Minna Kamppuri and Juha Virkkala and teaching assistant Anita Ikonen. In the 7th-9th forms the teachers are special education teachers Leena Papunen, Marika Mervola and Pekka Muikku and teaching assistant Heini Sokkanen.

Leena Papunen ( teacher in charge)